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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Perhaps some of you can enlighten me from personal experience or know people who may have graduated earlier than the average "4 year university."

Keeping in mind of the current circumstances in the U.S. economy, is there an advantage of graduating early? (3 years vs 4 years, and some may point out that there is not a big difference unless it was 2 years vs 4 years, why?).

I do plan on graduate school as well, but as a business major, I will real work experience under my belt before applying.

What type of advantages in graduating early would I benefit regarding work opportunities? Opportunities in general?

More so, I was planning on studying abroad, but due to financial hardship and the possibility of hindering an early graduation date, EAP in HK may be postponed.

Any thoughts?
 

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I thought you just cut the grass in the yard. Imhotep says you don't need college to do yard work.
 

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I graduate one year early because of AP credits I took in high school.

The positive was that I started work one year early and while my friends were still going to dive bars I was getting paid.

When we apply for MBA I will have one extra year of work experience.

However I think the "college experience" involved in club activities, networking, internships are much harder when you are not graduating with your normal class. But harder is not impossible.

I guess the bottom line is, is there an advantage to just blowing through school as quick as possible for the hell of it? no.

But if you can take for advantage of the whole experience but through the cutting back of going out 5 days a week you are able to graduate a year early, i so go for it.
 

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I have nothing really useful to say, but...

I could've graduated from UC Berkeley early because my major (Mass Comm) didn't have a ton of requirements, but I chose not to plan things out that way (but the cost wasn't an issue). I pursued my Portuguese minor and finished that before my last semester. This past spring, I only took two classes, but I used the extra time to pick up another internship that has strengthened my professional network and my resume for grad school (Sport Management). I graduated in four years with most of my friends.

I have a few friends who graduated one year or one semester early. Advantages: one started work for Lockheed Martin right away, another started working at a clinic to boost his med school apps, they all saved money (either for themselves or for their parents). The one who works for Lockheed had no real reason for finishing her engineering degree in three years plus two summers of summer sessions.

I think besides financial reasons, you have to look at if you can get everything you want out of college with graduating early. There are certain opportunities that you may not have later like EAP.
 

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Entering college, I never truly considered the thought of graduating early. I joked at it, merely of the novelty of graduating college at being no more than 20 years old...But really, college (at college age) is once in a life time. Once you graduate, you have the rest of your life to do whatever you attempt to do. Starting work early, yeah, sure. But you can always make money. If you really do want/need that year of experience of work before heading to graduate school...take a year off. I see leaving college early as missing opportunities, while I see staying in college for the full time (or longer than the standard five years), is postponing the grind. College, in essence, is delayed gratification anyways.

Oh, of course, money spent to go to college is an issue, especially since you're planning on probably going more in debt with graduate school. You're gonna be working most of your life making money already.
 

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Another thing to think about with the current economy is what the job market will be like when you graduate, whether it's in three years or four. I'd assume that now isn't a great time to be graduating and looking for a job, but if there's a boom then you might want to graduate and be out looking for a job. Just my $0.02.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the input.

In my 3rd year, I am beginning to think about life after college.

At the same time, speaking with a TA, I am highly considering in double majoring in some sort of science field. Biology or chemistry? A little a late perhaps, and really difficult to play catch up....but I'm considering the long run benefits of a dual degree in BUS and BIO/CHEM hmmmmmm


So much to think about!
 

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business degrees are the new communications degrees.
 

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Approach your education not as an achievement in itself but merely a tool for getting you in the door of what you want to do.

So...what do you want to do?
 

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Thanks for the input.

In my 3rd year, I am beginning to think about life after college.

At the same time, speaking with a TA, I am highly considering in double majoring in some sort of science field. Biology or chemistry? A little a late perhaps, and really difficult to play catch up....but I'm considering the long run benefits of a dual degree in BUS and BIO/CHEM hmmmmmm


So much to think about!
I'm in my 3rd year in Uni (Business Major - double concentration MIS and IB). Last year I decided I'm going to do Co-op, which takes a year out of my 4-year schedule. However, I'm still graduating on time, so basically I'm doing a 5-year program in 4 years... yay! I don't plan on getting my masters though... It's about time to think about life after Uni though, so you're right on track (like me :D)!

I know a lot of my friends are just taking it slow, doing it at their own pace. Same age as me, same time in Uni, but they have HALF the credits that I have so technically they're still in 2nd year... It's their choice but I think it's kind of stupid for people to stay in Uni for 6 years just for an Undergraduate degree.

Usually people in Business also major in Econ or Communications ;)

ETA: I also need to do Co-op to pay off my Student Loans after Uni ends :( So... I get experience AND pay off my debt. BOOYA :)
 

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Approach your education not as an achievement in itself but merely a tool for getting you in the door of what you want to do.

So...what do you want to do?
this is most likely the smartest thing you have ever posted on af
 

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no it's not. it's only good advice for those who view an education as a means of job training, ie. community college with higher stakes.
it's good advice for those who don't want to have a ton of debt and a degree that gets them nowhere.
 

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no it's not. it's only good advice for those who view an education as a means of job training, ie. community college with higher stakes.
I saw that one was coming...

My pragmatic life philosophy are always met with some resistance.
 

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I saw that one was coming...

My pragmatic life philosophy are always met with some resistance.
well i don't disagree with you. there just is something to say about pursuing academics as a pursuit in itself, although that won't pay the bills for most people
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I enjoy writing/researching, as well as some math on the side.

I was considering a concentration in finance with some marketing on the side. Of course, I will be applying for a MBA program.w

However, if I finished my undergraduate degree in business in 3 years, and perhaps another degree in biology/chemistry in 1.5 years, I'll have more options as far as careers. IMO, the medical field seems more stable though as far as a jobs goes.

I'll have to ask my TA how he likes his MBA program/job. Need some more confidents in the business field.
 

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I enjoy writing/researching, as well as some math on the side.

I was considering a concentration in finance with some marketing on the side. Of course, I will be applying for a MBA program.w

However, if I finished my undergraduate degree in business in 3 years, and perhaps another degree in biology/chemistry in 1.5 years, I'll have more options as far as careers. IMO, the medical field seems more stable though as far as a jobs goes.

I'll have to ask my TA how he likes his MBA program/job. Need some more confidents in the business field.
Why are you so intent on MBA...I'm doing a MBA because I need to to make the jump from equity research to banking. Why are you? And to put three letters after your name is not a good response.

From what you described you might do well in equity research. If that is the case I would recommend really honing your accounting skills to better understand modeling. And take as many elective finance classes even if they are not required.

Do you want to go for med school? If so go for the bio, or just take some classes and study for the MCATs.

Again I think you really need to think about what specific job you want to do, then do some research on what is needed to do well in that field. eg certifications, course work etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
My drive right now is work after school.

So, a MBA would bring forth more job opportunities in general (Or you can tell me if I 'm wrong).

On the other hand, a degree in bio along with med school will be "easier" in terms of finishing one thing after another, then working.

Of course, in terms of course work, a class in biology will more difficult. However, the career path will be more stable than bouncing around with different companies.



BTW, with a MBA, the "dream" is working with a fortune 500 company, advising with control and decision making, and on the side, making investments. Another interest is becoming an investor in small, growing companies, like an entrepreneur.
 

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I agree with Budda - take as many accounting classes as you can. When I first started with Georgia-Pacific I learned the business from the inside out by starting with the accounting dept.

Also, I don't believe you NEED an MBA unless its position-specific (as in Buddha's case). Just to "have" an MBA will get you no where. And, um, most MBA programs (unless they are the 5 year programs that are Bachelors + MBA) don't really want you unless you have been working a few years. As it should be - you have no practical application of business principals if you've only been a realm of academia for 4 years.
 
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