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Old 08-09-2008, 04:20 PM
jessani's Avatar
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Full text medical journal access, anyone? (I can't breathe when I work out!)

I'm trying to figure out if my breathlessness & rapid heart rate during exercise are related to my unilateral vocal cord paralysis and subsequent laryngeal framework surgery (medialization thyroplasty).
I thought my breathing problems during exercise would improve after the surgery, but they are the same or worse.
Anway, I found this article
Quote:
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1999 Jun;120(6):819-23. Links
Impact of laryngeal paralysis and its treatment on the glottic aperture and upper airway flow characteristics during exercise.Beaty MM, Hoffman HT.
University of Iowa Hospital, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, IA 52240, USA.

Patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis occasionally report shortness of breath during exercise. This symptom may persist in some patients after medialization thyroplasty. A review of the literature revealed no study that objectively evaluated laryngeal dynamics or airway flow characteristics during exercise after medialization thyroplasty for unilateral laryngeal paralysis. This study evaluates glottic aperture size and configuration as well as upper airway flow characteristics during exercise in 16 subjects. Six patients who underwent medialization thyroplasty for unilateral vocal fold paralysis were compared with 10 healthy control subjects. During a standardized exercise protocol on an incremental ergometer (bicycle type), real-time videolaryngoscopy was obtained and correlated in a synchronized fashion with maximum-effort respiratory efforts at the beginning, midpoint, and end of the exercise period. Direct calculations of glottic size during various phases of the exercise period were performed from digitized images. These data were correlated with inspiratory flow data for each patient. Patients with laryngeal paralysis demonstrated smaller mean glottic areas and lower peak inspiratory flow rates than controls both at rest and during all phases of the exercise period. This study suggests that after treatment of unilateral laryngeal paralysis with medialization thyroplasty, inspiratory flow rate and glottic area are significantly less than in normal controls.
and am looking for the full text.

My doctor would be the usual source of information, but he hasn't been super helpful. I am a runner and in the past year, I've gone from being able to easily run 6-7 miles at a time at a 10min/mile pace to struggling to run 2-4 miles at an 11-12 minute pace, and when I do, my heart rate is well above 190.
I feel like this has to be related to the vocal cord, since the onset was about the same time, though the exercise/breathing/heart rate didn't get really bad until Januaryish.

Some more articles I can't read:
Multidimensional assessment of functional outcomes of medialization thyroplasty.
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2005 Aug;262(8):616-21. Epub 2004 Dec 10.

Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 1996 Apr;105(4):280-5.
Quantitative videostroboscopic measurement of glottal gap and vocal function: an analysis of thyroplasty type I.Omori K, Kacker A, Slavit DH, Blaugrund SM.

Longitudinal evaluation of vocal function after thyroplasty type I in the treatment of unilateral vocal paralysis.
Laryngoscope. 1996 May;106(5 Pt 1):573-7.

Long-term results of different treatment modalities for glottic insufficiency.
Am J Otolaryngol. 2008 Jan-Feb;29(1):7-12.

Sipp JA, Kerschner JE, Braune N, Hartnick CJ.

Laryngeal aerodynamics after vocal fold augmentation with autologous fat vs thyroplasty in the same patient.
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2005 Aug;131(8):696-700.

Last edited by jessani; 08-09-2008 at 04:33 PM.
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Old 08-09-2008, 06:11 PM
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if you PM me your email address, i can send you pdf files of those (or most of those) articles
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Old 01-29-2013, 09:58 PM
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Breathing Problems after Vocal Cord Surgery

I had a thyroplasty put in back in 1990 and then again in 2009 for my vocal cord paralysis. FYI: I had cervical surgery on C 6/7 and the doctor accidentally cut my right vocal cord. I did great for 18 years and then for some reason in 2009 my vocal cord implant broke in half and they had to put a new one in. My doctor thinks that a virus attacked my body and caused this problem.

My breathing became worse both times. I am short of breath all of the time. It even gets worse when I workout. I continue to workout, because I do feel better after I am finished. My doctor says that is because my body has to use less oxygen that way.

I have done everything imaginable to overcome this problem. I received 9 allergy shots per week, had sinus surgery and have used many medicines such as steroids, nasal sprays, allergy pills, etc. Nothing has helped. I wish I could give you better news. It is very frustrating!
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